Travel Deals – Getting The Most From Your Travel Discounts

There are many reasons why firms offer reduced, or discounted travel deals, ranging from flights, up to packages which include several components, all inclusive in one price.

One of the main reasons for travel deals is the unsold places. Competition can also play a part in further reductions in list prices.

Before giving you a whole list of tips to get the best travel deals and discounts, I want to show you a amazingly simple but brilliant technique that you can use pretty much in most places and for most products and services.

I have used the technique all over the place it works so well it is almost unbelievable. But it is so simple that you may dismiss it without trying. I want you to be mentally prepared and be willing to give it a try, so here we go.

To get a discount or a bargain in most places, even in a high class boutique or a high street store, what you need to do is: “ASK”. Yes, just “ask”. But also I want you to remember, as they say, “… it is not what you say, but the way you say it …” that really counts.

So, to get a discount, you need to keep your intention to ‘buy’ to yourself until you’re ready to make your payment. You must always appear like you’re not convinced yet and that if the sales person doesn’t “do better” “he will lose” the deal. But you should also seem reasonably interested or else the sales person will think you’re not serious and therefore he won’t try to sweeten the deal for you.

OK, so how do you do all of the above? Easy and this is how I’ve done it for travel deals all the way to buying just 2 shirts at an up market men’s boutique – yes for just 2 shirts:

* I get information on the various options (be it travel deals or shirts).

* I decide what I want but will only – and this is the very important part – tell the sales person about a portion of what I want. So I may show interest in just one shirt or a holiday for 2 people and not 4.

* I ask all my questions and show that it is just what I want (so the sales person knows he almost has sale) but …

* I indicate that I’m not happy with the price. For example I may have seen something similar cheaper elsewhere. Or that I am prepared to go shopping around (all sales people know, if the customer walks out they usually will not come back). Or that I have the money (you’ll see why next) but had not planned on spending that much.

* I let the sales person try to ‘sell me the IDEA’ that it is OK to buy the product. Sometimes, they offer some free product (e.g. a pair of socks or tickets for a gallery or some show while on holiday). Then I ‘ask’ for the discount but make it clear that I will definitely buy if they give me the discount. This is how I ‘ask’ …

* “Look I’ll definitely take it at $X”. The sales person then says “… so you want $Y off the price?!”. They may tell you they don’t normally offer a discount outside of the sales season, etc. If they are very confident about not offering discounts, I then say “ok, I’ll take 2 shirts … this one and … that one, only if you give me them at $Z for both …”.

* At this stage the sales person may even say he hasn’t the authority to offer discounts. No problem, I ask them to speak to their boss. I have done this lots of times and get this: 90% of the time the boss agrees to the discount. Of the remaining 10% at least half the time, the boss offers me a counter discount which is a not as good as what I asked for but still pretty good.

Do you want to know the kind of discounts I’ve had? Well, on two shirts worth $62 I got $22 off. That is around 35%! On a travel package worth around $4,300, I got about $600 off but wait for it … I also got an upgrade from a deluxe room to a business suite in the same 5 star hotel. That suite was worth $800 per night and the deluxe room was worth $250 per night!

I had to explain the above details at length but all that I did was to display that I ‘WILL’ buy with a discount. They knew all they had to do was just one thing: give me a discount, so they did it. I made it, as they say, “a no brainer” for them.

In short just “ask” but (a) be realistic (let them make a little profit, don’t ask for 80% off) and (b) have a little flexibility as a backup plan (be ready to tell them that you’ll buy more, e.g. 2 shirts or a holiday for 4. Hey, even the sales people like to think they have got a concession form you … it is not a one-way street).

This technique works for almost everything but also works extremely well for travel bargains too. So lets get back to more tips specific to travel deals then.

Travel bargains, discounts and deals are all around you because we all travel regularly and repeatedly for holidays as well as for business and of course the travel industry competes for our dollars. Nevertheless, some research and being alert to travel deals can mean more substantial savings. Here’s how to spot and get the best travel deals:

* Booking as early as possible usually entitles you to some travel discount.

* If you’re buying more than one ticket, a further travel discount is possible.

* Be flexible. Sometimes weekend flights can be cheaper than weekdays (less business travellers).

* Flights departing later at night can be cheaper.

* Depending on your timetable, consider indirect flights, which take longer, but are probably cheaper, as opposed to direct flights.

* Travelling other than peak periods, such as schools holidays and public holidays will probably be heaper.

* More often than not, holiday packages are cheaper than buying the components separately.

* Compare prices online, by phone, or visit individual travel agents in the high street.

* As all airlines overbook, consider taking a later flight which usually comes with sweeteners from the airline in the form of further travel discounts, and travel vouchers.

* It may also be possible to travel on ‘stand by’, but it means that you’ll be called with very little notice

* If you’re lucky, it may be possible to travel as a ‘courier’. Some firms will pay, or subsidise your airfare in return for carrying important packages and letters.

* Buy travel insurance that best suits your circumstances. In case of emergencies it’ll save you lots of money.

The more time and effort you devote, the better travel deals you’ll bag. In many instances the saving could be quite substantial. So much so that you may be able to add on extra days stay. Happy travel deals.

Sami T Fab operates a dedicated travel and vacation information website packed full of free travel tips and informative content.

For more tips on travel deals and other travel subjects of interest to you, please do visit Travel Deals [http://www.Travel-Hotel-Beach-Vacations.com] at www.Travel-Hotel-Beach-Vacations.com [http://www.Travel-Hotel-Beach-Vacations.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Sami_Fab/26411

 

Travel Policies for Corporate Employees

Travel management companies offer a set of integrated travel solutions to their clients. A good corporate manager is able to set corporate travel policy guidelines and establish procedures for professionals traveling on company business. A proper travel policy plan maximizes cost benefits.

Corporate travel to countries at war and at risk of war must be avoided. Employees should not travel to countries, where travel warning has been issued by the state department. While traveling, safety and security strategy must be ensured. Employees traveling on University business must keep the corporate business travel card.

For corporate travel overseas, register with an embassy. These embassies provide all the support in case of emergency. Keep the telephone numbers and address of the nearest travel agency or embassy handy. Avoid carrying membership cards and luggage tags with company name.

Return travel arrangement must be made in advance. Also, re-confirm airline reservations 24 hours prior to departure. Give a copy of flight schedule and lodging details to your clients and associates. Avoid public gatherings and demonstrations. Business travelers should not accept any offers including gifts and packages from unknown people. It is recommended to view the recent travel advisories for your destinations. Because of increased political threats, always keep away from targeted locations. Do not show off your valuable documents and money to the public. Take personal responsibility for travel safety.

Corporate travelers must also take proper vaccinations. All professionals traveling on company business are required to take business travel insurance before planning their trip. Business travel insurance provides coverage for medical expenses, flight delay, trip cancellation, theft, and losses.

Designated corporate travel agencies offer unparalleled services to the clients. Travel agents ease your complicated corporate travel arrangements and provide needed assistance. They help you to get affordable hotel, discounted airfares, and car rentals.

Corporate Travel [http://www.WetPluto.com/Corporate-Travel.html] provides detailed information on Corporate Travel, Corporate Travel Services, Corporate Travel Agencies, Corporate Travel Management and more. Corporate Travel is affiliated with China Business Travel [http://www.i-BusinessTravel.com].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Seth_Miller/44827

 

How To Profit Handsomely From The Failure of The Travel Agent Industry

Contrary to what one might think, the tragic events of 911 and the subsequent “war on terror” have not stopped people from traveling. In fact, the demand for travel has actually been growing, mostly due to the ever-increasing numbers of retired baby boomers who love to travel. Now, the travel industry is generating annual revenue well in excess of 6 trillion dollars. However, despite this tremendous growth, the conventional travel agent business model has been failing miserably and this represents a great opportunity for you to profit handsomely by marketing wholesale travel direct to the public. Here’s why.

The key to the travel agents’ business was the their ability to get exclusive information to book travel. They had information that the general public was unable to get. In the past if you or I wanted to book a trip it would be necessary to use a travel agent who would access the information through private computer systems such a PARS, SABRE and APOLLO and then relay that information to us. We would use this information to get the best possible travel accommodations to fit our budget and schedule. The Internet has dramatically changed this situation.

Thanks to the Internet, the general public can now access information that was once only accessible by travel agents. Now anyone tap into airline websites directly to book flights and lodging accommodations. In addition to that, there are sophisticated travel search portals such as Priceline, Travelocity and Expedia that access huge databases of travel service to providers to offer attractively priced travel accommodations to the public. The competition for your travel dollar is extremely fierce.

This has had a negative impact on travel agent commissions. The generous commissions that conventional travel agents once enjoyed have now dwindled to nickels and dimes! The airlines reduced travel agent commissions to such an extent that they’ve effectively told the travel agents, “we don’t need you anymore”. Consequently storefront travel agents are leaving the business in droves! Three years ago there were about 190,000 travel agent storefronts in operation. Today that number is down to about 65,000. That’s roughly a decrease of 66 percent! You may refer to detailed supportive data compiled by the U.S. Department of Labor at this address – http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos124.htm

At this point it should be clear that the conventional travel agent business model is on the decline despite the growing demand for travel. There is yet another factor which I am about to share, that will make you realize the tremendous potential of the wholesale travel niche. That factor is excess capacity!

Excess capacity has always been a bane to the travel industry. Why? Because hotels, cruise lines and resorts can’t make money from empty rooms! So they are willing to negotiate surreptitiously with select travel service companies and even companies outside of the travel industry to make sure that those rooms are filled with travelers even if it means giving them away for free!

They know that once a traveler is on their property, that person will spend money at their affiliated gift shops, nightclubs, restaurants, tour programs and casinos etc. Thus, giving away free accommodations can turn out to be quite a profitable venture. So they’re eager to make arrangements with wholesale travel distributors who will help keep their room filled to capacity every night.

Wholesale travel packages allow a consumer to easily book their own travel arrangements with prestigious service providers and enjoy complimentary and deep discount travel privileges up to 75% off retail rates. Even the hugely popular travel search portals mentioned earlier can’t match these savings!

Marketing wholesale travel packages direct to the public is and extremely simple lucrative way for anyone profit from the annual multi-trillion dollar travel industry revue. It represents a perfect way for disheartened travel agents to adapt to the new travel industry environment as well!

Ariel Keis is an online marketing consultant and network marketing maven providing Free Lead Generation software and training for network marketers. Get your free copy of Ariel Keis’s Automatic Lead Generation ebook today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Ariel_Keis/30218

 

14 Ways to Make Traveling with a Disability Easier

If you travel with a disability, handicap, physical limitation, mobility limitation, or developmental disability, have special needs, or use an electric wheelchair or handicap scooter, it’s a good idea to learn as much as you can to make disabled travel easier.

Or if you’re a mature traveler or senior who is a slow walker or just wants a slower pace, becoming more informed about disabled travel services and disability travel resources, will lessen the anxiety that often accompanies disabled travelers.

The following travel tips, resources and information for the disabled will help make trips, tours, holidays and vacations a lot easier for you, or for a child with a disability, whether short-term or long-term.

1. Plan your trip well in advance! Do you need to order extra supplements, medications or renew prescriptions, fix eyeglasses or change prescriptions, get a physical, have dental work done, have your wheelchair fixed or tuned up, etc.?

2. If possible, always book your travel through an agency that specializes in helping people with disabilities. This is important because specialized travel agents and tour operators for the disabled are experienced and can save you some awful headaches.

They offer a lot of good tips and a wide range of services for the handicapped traveler. Among other things, they can arrange for a: wheelchair at the airport, wheelchair accessible hotel room, wheelchair rental, lift-equipped accessible van, full van, minivan, RV, handicap scooter, or any other handicap vehicle.

Travel agents for the disabled can help arrange accessible transportation, help plan the best accessible cruise, give cruise line and cruising tips, arrange travel insurance and take care of special needs.

Agents can check with hotels for: inner and outer door widths to accommodate your wheelchair, ADA-approved handicap bath tubs, grab bars, or for roll-in showers. Just tell them your needs.

Travel agents can help you find cheap airfare, cheap tickets, cheap flights, cheap travel auto insurance, cheap hotels, cheap car rentals, cheap cruises, cheap vacations and cheap travel of all kinds.

3. Besides taking along your travel agent’s phone number, you’ll also want to take with you the phone numbers for the travel agencies that specialize in disabled travel at your destination, in the event you can’t reach your own agent.

These travel agents may know how to solve problems that come up regarding your hotel, car or van rentals, etc., even if you didn’t order your tickets through them.

4. When traveling to another city, check out the local health and medical associations before you go. For example, get the phone numbers for the local MS chapter if you have MS. These organizations can be great resources.

They usually know what museums, restaurants, theaters & other local facilities are wheelchair accessible and where you can get oxygen, emergency supplies or medical assistance. They may be able to help you with any problems that arise.

5. If you plan to rent a handicap scooter, wheelchair, electric wheelchair, handicap van, full van, mini-van, RV or other vehicle in another city, don’t wait until you get there. Make all the arrangements before you leave on your trip.

Make sure you ask any specifics like, are there tie-downs, ramps, or hoists, etc. Check on what van, RV, car or auto insurance you’ll need before you go.

6. Don’t leave anything to chance. If you can, double-check all the arrangements your travel agent makes. Call the airlines, hotels, scooter, wheelchair, car, RV or van rental companies, medical equipment rental companies, etc., and verify the specifics, especially if you’re traveling in a wheelchair or have any other special needs like oxygen.

This is important if you haven’t used the agent before.

7. If you need oxygen or any other special medical equipment, call airlines and suppliers well in advance of your trip. Don’t wait until the last minute. Start calling them as soon as you know you’re going to be traveling or taking a trip.

Then double-check with your travel agent and the airline at least three to four days before your flight.

8. Arrive early at the airport. It’s better to wait around there than miss your plane. This will eliminate some of the pre-trip anxiety you might feel and make for more leisurely travel. This seems like common knowledge but many people still arrive at the gate just in the nick of time.

With all that’s going on in the world today there are many reasons why you want to allow for more time at the airport.

9. In your airplane carry-on bag keep copies of the prescriptions for your medications and eyeglasses, extra eyeglasses, sunglasses, all your medications and supplements, and a list of your doctor, dentist and other health professionals with their addresses, and phone numbers.

Include your doctor’s fax number for prescriptions in case you lose your medications. Keep duplicate copies of these in your luggage and at home by the telephone. Know where your medical records are kept.

10. When you travel, and for any other time too, if you take medications, learn their names and exactly what they’re for if you don’t know. People come into the emergency room all the time and don’t know what medications they’re taking. You might be surprised to find out that most people say ‘a little yellow pill’ or ‘a white capsule’, etc.

Emergency workers need to know what you’re taking so they don’t give you medication that would interact adversely with it, overdose you or somehow interfere with their treatment and your recovery.

11. If you’re traveling by air, tell the flight attendants when you board, of any medical problem you might encounter on your flight. Note the location of the closest restroom before getting seated. Tell the flight attendant if you think you’ll need assistance getting to it during the flight.

You may need or want an aisle seat for easy access to the restrooms. Discuss seating with your travel agent.

12. If you need someone to travel with you, ask your travel agent for ideas or suggestions. Call the local chapters of medical associations and ask if they can recommend a travel assistant or travel companion to help or accompany you.

There are national companies who offer traveling nurses, traveling companions or travel assistants to accompany disabled travelers or people with serious medical issues.

13. Make sure to take with you: any medical cards, Medicare cards, discount cards, car or auto rental discount cards, auto insurance policy numbers and agent’s phone number, passport, airline tickets, etickets, American Express Travelers Cheques, debit cards, credit cards, and drivers license. Photocopy everything.

Keep photocopies in your luggage and at home by the telephone or someplace where someone has access to it in case you need it.

14. Read everything you can about traveling with a disability. Read disabled travel books, access guides, accessible guidebooks, disability travel articles and travel publications for the disabled traveler. Read the personal travel experiences of wheelchair users and others who have traveled with disabilities. Be informed.

These travel tips, information, resources, and services for the disabled should help you, or anyone with a disability, handicap, physical limitation, or who uses a wheelchair, have an easier, more pleasant, anxiety-free, trouble-free trip, tour, holiday or vacation.

Helen Hecker R.N. is the author of ‘Travel for the Disabled’ and the ‘Directory of Travel Agencies for the Disabled’ and other books for travelers with disabilities. Get FREE weekly ‘Travel Tips for the Disabled’at www.AllAboutDisabledTravel.com [http://www.AllAboutDisabledTravel.com] Also get FREE ‘Disability News You Can Use’

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Helen_Hecker/23532

 

Air Travel Tips for Travelers with Health Issues or Disabilities

Travel by air for people with health issues, handicaps, disabilities or special needs, can be challenging. The following air travel tips will help make your flight and trip, whether domestic or international, easier, cheaper and safer.

When making your travel reservations, request any carts, wheelchair services or any other transportation you’ll need. Fully describe your limitations and needs. Get your airline ticket and boarding pass well ahead of time so you don’t have to wait in any lines. You’ll be able to arrange travel at a discount, get better travel deals, and avoid last minute travel headaches.

Talk with your airline representative or travel agent regarding the type of restrooms that are on the airplane. Call your airport and find out as much information as possible about the restrooms and handicapped parking at the airport.

You’ll need to find out how you’ll be boarding the airplane at each of the airports involved in your trip. You may need another type of airplane or alternative route so you’ll have Jetways, or jet bridges, into the plane from the airport and not have to worry about stairs.

One year my mother and I were going to fly out of the San Jose, California airport and discovered after we arrived that we had to go outside on the ground level with the wheelchair to the tarmac. Four airline employees had to carry my mother in the wheelchair up the steep steps to board the plane. This might be impossible if there are weight issues.

Think about what seat arrangement will work best for you needs. Would an aisle seat make it more convenient to get to the restroom? You’ll want to avoid sitting in the emergency exit row. The passengers in this row may be asked to help others in an emergency situation.

Let the airlines and flight attendants know if you have any assisting devices. Find out the best way to store them so they arrive without damage.

Always keep in mind what you can do easily and without assistance, as well as situations that would require help.

Can you transfer to seats by yourself? Will you need a transfer board or assistance from airline staff?

Consider hiring a travel nurse if you have serious health or medical issues. There are traveling nurses networks.

Can you describe your wheelchair, scooter or walker, dimensions, weight, type of tires, type of batteries, etc.? You may need to take along spare batteries. You also may need to rent or buy a travel wheelchair.

Make sure to mention to your travel agent or airline representative any assisting devices you may need or already have like canes and crutches. Do you need a slow pace or are you a slow walker?

If you will be traveling through different time zones, how will jet lag affect your situation?

Consider how the following will be of concern during your trip and discuss with your travel agent: upper body strength, communication ability, speech issues, voice issues, vision problems, hearing problems, heat issues, medication needs, oxygen requirements, and dietary requirements such as gluten-free meals.

Try to arrange or book your air travel through experienced travel agencies or tour operators that specialize in disabled travel. There are a large number of agencies throughout the U. S., Canada, Europe, Australia and many other countries.

Just in case you need them, it’s also good to know if there are any travel agencies that specialize in disabled travel at your destination, for return travel, local resources or travel services.

At the airport let airline boarding personnel know that you may need extra time to board the plane. Sit close to the door at the gate so you’re called first and then board at a comfortable pace.

After the plane has landed, never get off the plane until you see or have your assisting device, wheelchair, travel wheelchair, etc. Flight attendants have to stay on the airplane until the last passenger leaves. They will help you while you’re on the plane but once you’re off the plane they won’t be able to help you.

Make sure you carry your medications and back-up prescriptions with you onto the plane, along with doctors’ names, addresses, fax numbers for faxing prescriptions, phone numbers, medical diagnosis, names and dosages of medications you’re taking and any allergies you have.

Photocopy passports, airline tickets, American Express Travelers Cheques, credit cards, any important papers.

Carry your health insurance information with you on the plane. Know what you’ll do if you encounter a health problem or medical emergency on your trip. Get travel insurance to ensure less costly medical assistance. These emergency bills may not be covered under your health insurance policy. It’ll ease your mind to have this back-up travel insurance and prevent costly emergency medical charges on your trip. Emergency medical costs can run considerably higher than standard medical fees.

These air travel tips should provide good insurance and help make your airplane travel, with health issues, handicaps, disabilities or special needs, easier, safer and cheaper.

For more information on air travel tips for the disabled and travel tips for people with health issues, go to www.AllAboutDisabledTravel.com [http://www.AllAboutDisabledTravel.com] a website specializing in travel and transportation tips, advice and resources including information on travel nurses and travel insurance

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Helen_Hecker/23532